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Job Life

Before coming to Japan you are provided with a lot of job-specific information that usually comes with the reminder that ‘every situation is different’.  Whilst every JET situation is in fact different, there are some similar experiences shared by certain types of JETs.  Below are some accounts of different kinds of work situations written by JETs, based on their experiences working in Fukuoka.

Life as a High Academic SHS ALT

In coming to Japan, I was resigned to my fate as a human tape recorder.  I imagined myself as the parrot in class, squawking out English phrases and vocabulary whenever the teacher pointed at me.  I couldn’t have been any more wrong.  Though I do assume the role of the parrot occasionally, I’ve found that …

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Life as a Low Academic SHS ALT

I am an ALT at two low academic senior high schools, meaning I spend 3 days a week at my “base” school, and two days a week at my second school. Both are slightly different schools to the mainstream Japanese high school, my base school being a commercial (business focused) high school, and the other an …

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Life as a Municipal ALT

Being a municipal ALT means your contracting organization is the local town or city as opposed to the majority of Fukuoka JET ALTs who are employed by the prefecture. The differences are mainly administrative but there are some common differences in living situations. Many prefectural ALTs live in the prefectural teacher apartments or jutaku, whereas municipal …

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Life at a Special Needs School

When I received my placement in Fukuoka two years ago, my predecessor told me that once a week I’d be “loaned out” to a school for the blind. Speaking no Japanese at the time, I was concerned about how I’d communicate with the students — at my base school, visual cues, gestures and body language seemed to go …

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Life at an Agricultural High School

I visit Fukuoka Agricultural High School, affectionately known as Fukuno, two days a week. Fukuno is the only agricultural school in the Fukuoka City region. Often, when asked where I teach, the reaction to “Fukuoka Nogyo Koko” is disappointing, especially when I proclaim that I love it – “Honto?” (“Really – you do?”). Puzzled faces …

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Life as an SHS ALT

Tuesday, 26 May 2009 12:32 I am a JET with a family. I have a Japanese wife and two preschool boys. I’m from New Zealand and my family and I decided to move to Japan to live – in order for me and our sons to experience my wife’s Japanese culture. On Aug 3 I …

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Life as a Kitakyushu City ALT

About the job Kitakyushu  City vs. Fukuoka Prefecture Out of the 200 or so JETs in Fukuoka Prefecture, there are 12 of us who are employed directly by the Kitakyushu City Board of Education (BOE). Despite living very close to the Fukuoka Prefectural JETs, there are several small but significant differences between our job types. …

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Life as a JHS ALT

Welcome to Fukuoka! If your welcome letter includes “Fukuoka-ken” without any city designation or reference to a high school, then you are in luck! You are in a group of  Prefectural JETs based out of six regional offices. When you arrive in August, you will be shown to your regional Board of Education office. We …

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Life as a Designated City CIR

Fukuoka City CIR Designated Cities are cities with a population of over 500,000 that have been entrusted with administrative powers of prefectural governments.  I was lucky enough to be placed in the beautiful city of Fukuoka.  Located in the heart of Kyushu Island, it is a bustling cosmopolitan with a population of 1.4 million.  Not …

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Life as a Municipal CIR

A unique opportunity offered by the JET Programme is the chance to be placed in a rural setting or small town, and experience a side of Japan often inaccessible to those who stay within the bounds of the well-known metropolitan areas. On top of this, working as a Coordinator of International Relations (CIR) within this …

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Fukuoka JET Dress Code

The dress code as presented here will primarily be enforced when and where other Board of Education staff members are expected to uphold similar dress standards (ex: at BOE staff meetings or events).  Everyone, unless otherwise permitted by the BOE, is expected to observe the dress code as outlined here.  For appropriate dress at your …

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