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Sending Money Home

With extremely low interest rates in Japan, there may be little benefit to keeping your money in a Japanese account.  Some JETs also are trying to pay off loans and credit cards.  If you want to send money abroad this is a good start:

Just remember that  service fees are charged by each institution that handles your money, including intermediary banks.

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Post Office Overseas Remittance/Money Order

Flat fee of ¥2500 to send any amount by wire transfer to an overseas account or by money order to a payee’s address.

Send funds from a postal account or bring cash to the post office.

On the remittance form specify the destination (bank or postal) account number, routing number and account holder (this can be your name).

For a money order, specify the payee’s name and address (this cannot be your name as the payee will have to cash in the money order). Funds arrive in five to seven days.

Not all countries (including Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa) can have money sent home via the Post Office. www.yu-cho.japanpost.jp/e_s0000000/ssk20000.htm

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GoRemit

GoRemit is a part of Shinsei Bank. GoRemit funds electronically from a Japanese ATM to an overseas account (furikomi). ¥2000 flat fee plus your Japanese bank’s furikomi fee. Funds arrive within one or two business days. www.goremit.jp/index/en  The whole process may cost around 4000-5000 yen.

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Tips for Sending Money Home

If you send money regularly, ask the post office assistant to print you several pre-printed forms with your personal details and bank information.  If you send money via GoRemit, get a furikomi card/passbook made with your details on it to use at the ATM. This will save you a lot of time and frustration in the future.